The island of Lanzarote is really full of unusual and wonderful places to visit. In our opinion these are not to be missed:

TIMANFAYA NATIONAL PARK

Timanfaya was declared a National Park on August 9, 1974. It occupies an area of 51.07 km² in the south west of the island and the entire park is of volcanic origin. The most recent volcanic eruptions took place in the 18th century, between the years 1730 and 1736. Among its most well-known volcanoes are La Montaña de Fuego (Fire Mountain), la Caldera del Corazoncillo (Little Heart Cauldron) and Montaña Rajada (Cracked Mountain). There is still a great deal of volcanic activity, with hot points that can reach up to up to 100-120°C on the surface, and 600°C at a depth of 13 metres.

timanfaya

FUNDACIÓN CÉSAR MANRIQUE

The César Manrique Foundation is the island’s cultural centre par excellence that has won international recognition, not only because it houses some of the works of the world famous artist, painter, sculptor and architect himself.

JAMEOS DEL AGUA

This volcanic lava tube extends to the sea and connects with the Cueva de los Verdes, passing through the Cueva de los 7 Lagos (this cave is closed to the public). The volcanic tube has been converted by renowned Lanzarote artist, painter, sculptor and architect, César Manrique.

EL GOLFO

El Golfo is truly one of the rarest examples of hidrovolcanism, volcanic activity that takes place at low altitude. The lake that emerged in the area was given the name Laguna de los Clicos.

miradorMIRADOR DEL RÍO

A Mirador is a constructed viewing point, and the Mirador del Río is the most important of the many built by the Lanzarote artist, architect, painter and sculptor, César Manrique. The Mirador provides a breathtaking view of the entire Chinijo archipelago, in particular the view of the island of La Graciosa, and a visual effect that would normally only be seen by parachutists.

CUEVA DE LOS VERDES

The Cave (Cueva) was used as a shelter by the Majos Guanches (Canarian aborigines) against the threats of the many Berber pirates that were constantly devastating the Island.

CACTUS GARDEN

In this Cactarium, all of the species are cultivated in a volcanic stone (volcanic pebbles or shingle) that the locals use for their planting, as it remains damp for a long period of time.

CASTILLO DE SAN JOSÉ

The Castillo de San José, a fortress built between 1776 and 1779, was commissioned by the king of Spain, Carlos III, and today houses the International Museum of Contemporary Art. The castle is popularly known as La Fortaleza del Hambre (The Fortress of Hunger). The people of the island experienced a lot of hardship during these difficult years with disease, thirst and hunger the main causes of death.

LAS SALINAS DE JANUBIO

The historical records of the Salinas (salt pans) de Janubio tell of the existence of a wasteland, where wheat, rye, barley and corn were cultivated. No evidence of this exists at the current salt pans, which began to be worked as such in 1985. Today, the Padrón Lleó family continues working these salt pans as they have for the past 50 years. With the decline of fishing and increasing competition from elsewhere, the production of salt has decreased considerably.